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Impact

We work directly with the Parks and their Friends (or support) organizations to understand their needs and together determine projects we can help contribute towards. 

National Parks

Every year park rangers are asked to do more with less. They receive only 82 cents of every dollar they need to maintain roads and visitor centers, keep the wildlife safe from poachers, provide medical support for the visitors, and preserve important historical and cultural landmarks. Due to these budget cuts, roads are falling into disrepair, park rangers are required to cover larger and larger areas, and many of the irreplaceable historical sites need more and more attention every year.

QUARTER-BACK MODEL

We will use our Quarter-back model to give 25% of our profits to protect the future of the National Parks. As the impact of these donations takes effect, check back for updates on your role in saving part of our national heritage.

See the Parks & Projects we are supporting:

  • INDEPENDENCE
    HISTORICAL
    PARK
  • OLYMPIC
    NATIONAL
    PARK
  • glacier
    national
    park
  • acadia
    national
    park
  • yellowstone
    national
    park

Independence National Historical Park

challenges or issues

1.  Staffing Shortages

2.  Raising awareness for the relevancy of the park to diverse audiences

3.  Preserving our historical treasures in the face of a challenging urban environment

PROJECTS

Law Enforcement Bike Fund – most of Independence National Historical Park Law Enforcement rangers are trained to work on bicycles as it is easier to get around our urban park as well as being enviromentally safe.  Typically the bikes they use last only about 2-3 years before they need major maintenance or need to be replaced.  This fund is being set up so that the Friends can purchase a new bike every year and assist with the cost for maintaining our current bicycles. Read more this project.

Funding Goal: $5,000  - FUNDED, GOAL REACHED

Funding Partner: Friends of Independence National Historical Park

Independence National Historical Park

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Though not nearly as large as Yosemite or Yellowstone, and certainly not as wild, Independence National Historical Park is located in the downtown historic district of Philadelphia, the park was not officially established until 1948, but was first proposed in 1915 by two architects, Albert Kelsey and D. Knickerbacker Boyd.

They proposed the creation of a national park to "lessen the fire hazard, reduce congestion, and beautify the district" around Independence Hall. The national patriotic sentiment that arose during and after WWII helped to push this idea forward, and in June 1948 the park and its buildings were given to the National Park Service.

In the center of the park is Independence Hall, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and the building where both the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution were debated and created. Nearby historical sites are the Liberty Bell in Liberty Bell Center, the First Bank of the United States, and museums honoring Benjamin Franklin, the United States Postal Service, and the Constitution.

The President's House, where both George Washington and John Adams lived when Philadelphia was the nation's capitol prior to the formation of the District of Columbia, was demolished in the 1950's and an exhibit was created to interpret the history of this site.

The park is open each day and offers many tours led by Park Rangers or volunteers, such as Stories from the Past (highlighting people who played a role in the foundation of Philadelphia), Jefferson in Philadelphia, Dr. Franklin's Philadelphia, Barnacles and Bullets (about the life of an average soldier or sailor during the American Revolution), or the Independence Square and the American Civil War tours. These tours truly make history come alive for the thousands of visitors – amongst them many young students – who flock there every year.

Olympic National Park

PROJECTS

Ranger on Campus The Ranger on Campus program puts a park ranger in the classroom for residential field science courses at NatureBridge, located on Lake Crescent in Olympic National Park. Uniformed rangers would teach alongside NatureBridge teachers during the spring education season, bringing the "flat hat" to the campus. The presence of a ranger is a visual reminder to students that they are learning in a national park. Public support for science and research begins with a public that is scientifically literate. As students conduct their own science project, the "Ranger on Campus" will lead students in the process of scientific inquiry in the national park. This project aligns with WNPF's core area of strengthening youth and family programs, while bringing the excitement of scientific discovery to thousands of students.

Funding Goal: $13,500

Funding Partner: Washington's National Park Fund

Olympic National Park

 

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Olympic National Park is a place of tremendous natural diversity and breathtaking beauty with over 922,651 acres of preserved wilderness. Little has changed since its first traces as a home of Native American tribes and, later, its first settlements by Europeans in the late 1500s. President Grover Cleveland designated the Olympic Peninsula's forests as the Olympic Forest Reserve in 1897, forever preserving its serenity and majestic beauty in History.

Ultimately, in 1938, President Franklin Roosevelt signed the act establishing Olympic National Park.

In 1981, the Historic Olympic National Park was named a World Heritage site in recognition of its exceptional natural beauty and outstanding diversity of plants and animals. Located in the northwest of Washington State, Olympic National Park is renowned for the diversity of its ecosystems. An extensive old growth forest surrounds glacier-clad peaks interspersed with many alpine meadows, making Olympic National Park the best example of intact and protected temperate rainforest in the Pacific Northwest.

Source: http://www.olympicnationalparks.com/olympic-peninsula-history.aspx

Glacier National Park

PROJECTS

Glacier Youth Corps Partnership The Glacier Conservation Corps provides an opportunity to address three of our priorities with a single project. It engages youth in worthwhile employment, helps build their resumes, perhaps creating conservationists, and helps fulfill our "education" priority. It allows the park to get work done on trails and historic structures, fulfilling our "preservation" priority. It addresses Citizen Science research by having additional observers in the field all summer, fulfilling our "research" objectives. It showcases an exciting new program for youth resulting from several national park partners working together. With a very successful first season completed, we plan to expand this opportunity by adding two more crews for younger (15-17 year old) members, focusing on local populations and youth from the Blackfeet and Flathead Reservations.

Probably the greatest value of the program lies in the fact that it connects these young people in a deep and meaningful way to Glacier National Park, building a new generation of leaders and stewards for our parks and public lands

Funding Goal: $20,000 to expand program

Funding Partner: Glacier National Park Conservancy


Glacier National Park

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Throughout time, people have sought out Glacier National Park's rugged peaks, clear waters, and glacial-carved valleys; its landscape giving both desired resources and inspiration to those persistent enough to venture through it.
Evidence of human use in this area dates back to over 10,000 years. By the time the first European explorers came into this region, several different tribes inhabited the area. The Blackfeet Indians controlled the vast prairies east of the mountains, while the Salish and Kootenai Indians lived in the western valleys, traveling over the mountains in search of game and to hunt the great herds of buffalo on the eastern plains.

The majority of early European explorers came to this area in search of beaver and other pelts. They were soon followed by miners and, eventually, settlers looking for land. By 1891, the completion of the Great Northern Railway sealed the area's fate, allowing a greater number of people to enter into the heart of northwest Montana. Homesteaders settled in the valleys west of Marias Pass and soon small towns developed.

Around the turn of the century, people started to look at the land differently. For some, this place held more than minerals to mine or land to farm…they began to recognize that the area had a unique scenic beauty all to its own.

By the late 1800s, influential leaders like George Bird Grinnell, pushed for the creation of a national park. In 1910, Grinnell and others saw their efforts rewarded when President Taft signed the bill establishing Glacier as the country's 10th national park.

Source: http://www.nps.gov/glac/historyculture/index.htm

Acadia National Park

PROJECTS

Acadia Quest Program The Acadia Quest Program is a season long friendly competition designed to get families outside exploring the park, learning about our National Park, and engaged in stewardship activities.

Funding Goal: $2,500

Funding Partner: Friends of Acadia

Acadia National Park

 

 

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

The landscape architect Charles Eliot is credited with the idea for the park.[8] George B. Dorr, called the "father of Acadia National Park," along with Charles's father Charles W., the president of Harvard, supported the idea both through donations of land and through advocacy at the state and federal levels. It first attained federal status when President Woodrow Wilson, established it as Sieur de Monts National Monument on July 8, 1916, administered by the National Park Service. On February 26, 1919, it became a national park, with the name Lafayette National Park in honor of the Marquis de Lafayette, an influential French supporter of the American Revolution.

The park's name was changed to Acadia National Park on January 19, 1929, in honor of the former French colony of Acadia which once included Maine.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acadia_National_Park

With its pink-granite mountains and coastline, uniquely varied ecosystems, and historic trails and carriage roads, Acadia is a place where magnificent natural and cultural treasures interweave to create a visitor's dream destination. Its small size, many recreational opportunities, and easy access from surrounding communities make Acadia ideal for visitors young and old, whether they spend just a few hours, an entire season, or a lifetime here.).

Source: http://friendsofacadia.org/visiting-acadia/

Yellowstone National Park

This will fund a group of 10 teens and adult leaders for an intense week of leadership and learning in Yellowstone this summer. For these kids, this is the first trip they have ever taken to Yellowstone, and for most, their first trip far from home. The program uses the Park experience as a catalyst for these kids to broaden their world views, and plan for how they can make a difference in their communities and in their own lives.

Funding Partner: Yellowstone Park Foundation

Park Journeys: $10,000

Yellowstone National Park

 

 

HISTORY OF PARK

In 1809 American explorer John Colter first began sharing reports of a land of boiling mud, water that shot into the sky, and quaking earth, most people wrote off his reports as those of a crazy person, even going so far to laughingly call the area "Colter’s Hell." Despite other reports to support his story, it wasn’t until 1869 that the stories could be verified by a private month-long expedition of the area.

Yellowstone was the first of the National Parks, and in many ways the most impressive. Established in 1872 by the U.S. Congress and President Ulysses S. Grant, it covers more than 3,400 square miles in the states of Wyoming, Montana and Idaho. Within its borders is the Yellowstone Caldera, the largest supervolvcano on the continent, half of the world’s geothermal features, and the largest intact ecosystem in the Earth’s northern temperate zone; hundreds of species of mammals, birds, fish and reptiles live there, including a great many that are endangered. Old Faithful geyser, the Great Salt Lake, the North American continental divide, and a huge petrified forest are just a few of the awe-inspiring sites to be seen within the borders of the park.

With breathtaking views, gorgeous trails, ancient forests, exotic wildlife, and awe-inspiring natural features, Yellowstone National Park is a place that once seen will not fade from your memory.

Join us as we preserve tomorrow.

We use our Quarter-Back model to give 25% of our profits to help preserve the future of our National Parks.